Types of wood

Unsure about what type of wood we use or whether the treatment it has is suitable for your needs? We’ve added some information below. If this isn’t quite what you are looking for, we can make you something to your specific requirements, just get in touch.

Walnut

Walnut is a close grained hard wood, the colour varying between light golden brown and light grey brown, often with a rich grain pattern. Burr Walnut is the term for walnut with knotty whorls in the grain where injuries occurred on the trunk or the roots of the tree. Source of info

Oak

Oak is a slow growing tree, taking between 150 – 200 years to reach maturity. The wood is hard and pale in colour, but darkens to a rich brown with age and polishing.  Source of info

 

Mahogany

Mahogany is a close grained hardwood, native to South America and the West Indies. It varies in colour from dark brown to red and occasionally has a spotted effect.  Source of info

 

Pine

Pine wood is a soft, fairly durable wood, although not as resistant to scuffs, dents and abrasions as the hardwoods. With a creamy-white colouration, it has some grain pattern, fresh pine can have distinct knot patterns whereas more antique varieties have more muted tones. Source of info

 

Elm
Elm is a hard and durable wood. Chairs were made from elm in the Georgian period. It has a particularly attractive grain and polishes well.

 

Yew

Yew produces a spectacular chestnut brown timber with streaks of orange and even purple, contrasting richly with the pale cream sapwood.

 

Maple

Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture.It has excellent shock resistance and is often used in bowling alleys and athletic facilities. Colouration is light reddish-brown with deeper-colored late-wood bands. The sapwood is white in colour. Source of info

 

Beech
It is heavy and strong with a pale pinkish brown colour with numerous small radial flecks (medullar rays) of warm brown.

 

 

 

Sycamore
Sycamore is a hard, pale wood with a fine even grain. It is also known as Harewood.

 

Cherry
Cherry is straight-grained and satiny. Small gum pockets produce distinctive markings. It is light & strong with a rich, reddish-brown colouration. Cherry darkens considerably with age and exposure to sunlight. Source of info

 

Ash
Ash is a highly grained pale creamy wood. It is popular not only for its looks, but also for its ease of working and incredible strength. It is an ideal wood for making furniture.


 

Birch
Birch timber has an even pale yellow brown or fawn colour with a straight grain and fine uniform texture. The wavy or ‘masur’ markings on some boards give a very spectacular flamy birch sheen.


 

Wood treatment

Treatment comparisons
TreatmentShellacOilVarnishWaxLacquer
FinishSilkMattGloss (unless over wise stated)SilkGloss
Food safeYesDependant on typeYesNoYes
Water Resistant NoNoYesYesYes
Water BasedNoNoNoNoNo